PulsePoint Increases Community Awareness of AEDs

SVFD ReenactmentYour chances of surviving a heart attack at Spokane Valley City Hall soon will improve.

After learning about a new effort that uses smartphones to alert CPR-trained volunteers to life-threatening emergencies nearby, city leaders decided to purchase a heart-jolting automated external defibrillator that paramedics say can dramatically improve chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest.

The easy-to-use medical device, which cost about $1,250, is set to arrive in the next couple of weeks.

“I think we were kind of surprised when we realized there wasn’t one here,” said Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard.

The decision came after the City Council was told last month that Spokane-area fire departments are mapping the locations of AEDs in publicly accessible sites countywide.

The electronic map is part of a smartphone app called PulsePoint that’s linked to the county’s 911 system and alerts trained volunteers to emergencies at the same time that paramedics are being dispatched. The app guides volunteers to the location of the emergency and also shows whether any AEDs are nearby.

It’s available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play. Volunteers must register.

Once the city’s new AED arrives, City Hall will be added to the PulsePoint map.

So far, authorities have mapped 102 publicly accessible AEDs in Spokane Valley and they expect that number to climb rapidly over the next year because firefighters now will be asking business owners about the availability of the devices while doing annual site checks, said Fire Chief Bryan Collins.

The Spokane Fire Department and several rural fire protection districts also are mapping AED locations.

The app was developed in northern California where Collins worked before being hired in Spokane Valley.

On average, at least two people a day go into sudden cardiac arrest across Spokane County, said Collins, and chances of survival improve the quicker CPR or AED treatment is initiated.

The PulsePoint app uses smartphone GPS technology to determine whether any CPR volunteers are near the scene of an emergency and alerts them that help is needed. The goal is to get at least hands-only CPR initiated within the first three to five minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.

See the original article on The Spokesman-Review.

El Camino Hospital And Fire Departments Of Santa Clara County Launch Free CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile Phone App

Citizen CPR, Provided Immediately After Sudden Cardiac Arrest,
Can Double or Triple a Person’s Chance of Survival

PulsePoint Alerts CPR-Trained Bystanders That Someone Nearby May Require CPR

PulsePoint/ECH Special Event Signage

PulsePoint Press Conference

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., February 14, 2014 – Today, residents throughout Santa Clara County will have the technology available to provide assistance to a person experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) who may be in need of CPR. El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County and the PulsePoint Foundation announced the availability of the revolutionary PulsePoint mobile phone application to all of Santa Clara County.

“Every day, we treat patients in our emergency rooms that have sudden cardiac arrest. We know that quick action to restore heart function is essential to full recovery,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital, “Two years ago, El Camino Hospital provided the funding needed for the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation to enable our fire departments and emergency response systems to make this technology available to our community. This is an important investment to bringing this life-saving technology to Santa Clara County.”

Integrated with the 911 system, the location-based mobile app notifies CPR-trained citizens, who are in the immediate vicinity, of the critical need for CPR nearby. The app also directs these citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This notification happens simultaneously with the dispatch of emergency service crews to alert bystander response while emergency services make their way to the scene.

“The close collaboration between El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County, the PulsePoint Foundation and Workday, a tech company, is a great example of how public and private partnerships can benefit our entire community,” said Mike Wasserman, President of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, representing District 1. “Congratulations to all who made today’s launch possible. It’s a point of pride that Santa Clara County is the first county nationwide to have 100% of its residents covered by this technology.”

“The Pulse Point app lets everyday folks make a life-saving difference in those first few minutes when emergency services are on the way,” said Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor for District 5. “I’m really pleased this technology is now available throughout the County. Today we’re asking the residents of Santa Clara County to do two simple things – download the PulsePoint app to your cell phone, and learn or brush up on your CPR skills.”

“Today’s launch could not have been possible without the coordinated efforts of nine Fire Chiefs from across Santa Clara County to ensure that our systems would enable citizen responders – no matter where they are in the county –to come to the aid of someone in need,” said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “With the aging of our county’s population we can expect that more people will experience sudden cardiac arrest, so we welcome innovative approaches like PulsePoint to improve our collective ability to save lives.”

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 360,000 deaths each year or 1,000 deaths per day. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. CPR or AED use helps restore the heart’s normal rhythm. However, from the onset of a SCA, for every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes, chances of survival are minimal. That is why effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.

PulsePoint was developed by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications. The idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained but don’t often know their skills are required. PulsePoint is being used in more than 525 communities across 17 states. It was launched in San Jose in 2012, where there are currently more than 15,000 devices that have downloaded the app.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. For more information about the PulsePoint app and to link to CPR classes throughout the county, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

The Importance of Hands-Only CPR

CPR TrainingIn honor of American Heart Month, local first responders are teaming up to re-educate the public on the importance of heart health and cardiac issues.

Every year 360,000 Americans suffer from cardiac arrest outside of the hospital and every 90 seconds someone dies from cardiac arrest.

Unfortunately, only 41% of people who suffer a heart attack get help from a by-stander or witness. In the Fargo-Moorhead area that number is as low as 33%.

One of the main reasons area first responders have teamed up to stress the importance of giving Hands-Only CPR. Paramedics and firefighters say it’s easy and can be done in two simple steps.

View the news story at Valley News Live.

Building A Community of Everyday Heroes

Patrick Shearer hosts Nathan J. Travernicht, Fire Chief, UC Davis Fire Department, and Shawn Kinney, Division Chief, City of Davis Fire Department to discuss the roll out of “PulsePoint,” an app that citizens with CPR experience can download and use to help save lives. They also discuss Sidewalk CPR programs, involving citizens with the fire department, and automatic external defibrillators.

Samaritans with Smartphones

What if your loved one suffered cardiac arrest at the mall and you could immediate alert a team of plain-clothed lifesavers shopping nearby? Starting this month, Spokane County has an app for that.

The Current Cover Feb 2014

Read the full cover story by Craig Howard at The Current.

Smart phone app to help save lives

ABC News12SAGINAW COUNTY (WJRT) – When a heart attack strikes, seconds matter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, topping cancer and strokes.

Two local organizations are doing everything they can to connect people with technology that saves lives.

The Pulse 3 Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are using a smart phone app. It’s called PulsePoint. It’s free and you can find it in the app store on your phone.

“It’s an amazing app,” said Lynn Schutter, Director of Communications at Mobile Medical Response.

When seconds matter, “You need to act immediately in instances of cardiac arrest,” Schutter said.

According to Schutter, Saginaw County averages one heart attack a day.

“Our response times are six and eight minutes, within the city of Saginaw,” Schutter said.

“If an ambulance gets to you in six minutes, which is a phenomenal response time, your chance of living is already down to 40 percent, so we want to get help to you as soon as we can,” said Diane Fong, CEO of Pulse 3 Foundation.

While emergency crews are on the way, they’ll use PulsePoint to save time and lives.

“An alert will go out when it’s in a public location,” Fong said.

“Similar to an amber alert,” Schutter said.

If someone is having a heart attack, 911 will dispatch an ambulance, and MMR will send an alert through the app to get the attention of people nearby who are trained in CPR. PulsePoint also lets them know where the nearest automated external defibrillator can be found.

“We are the only service provider to bring the Pulse app to the state of Michigan,” Schutter said.

Right now, the feature is only available in Saginaw, Isabella, Gratiot and Clare counties. More than 3,000 people have already signed up to get the alerts, and the search is on for more volunteers.

“What we want is people who are willing to step in to help,” Fong said.

“If we can get bystanders to step in and give that immediate help while we are on the way, we can really save a life,” Schutter said.

Read the full story by Candace Burns at ABC.

Local news coverage of Moorhead, MN and Fargo, ND PulsePoint launch

Moorhead FD (MN) and Fargo FD (ND) unveil PulsePoint at a joint press conference. Local broadcast TV news clips are shown below.


Valley News Live


WDAY News


FOX News

Local Fire Departments Develop New App

Moorhead ProfileHave you ever wanted to be a superhero?

Well, even though you won’t ever be able to fly, the Moorhead and Fargo Fire Departments have joined a mobile device app service called Pulsepoint that could give you superpowers.

The application’s motto is “Enabling Citizen Superheroes” and the Fire Department hopes it will do just that.

Do you know CPR?

Are you willing to save a life?

These are the main questions behind the app PulsePoint.

“A citizen running the application will receive a notification, if they sign up for alerts, when they are within one quarter mile of somebody recording a cardiac arrest incident in Fargo Moorhead. There might be somebody only a minute away that is trained in CPR and is able and willing to help,” said Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin.

More than 1,000 people die from cardiac arrest each day, and ¼ of those people don’t get CPR in time.

This smart phone application will notify people when someone in their immediate area is suffering sudden cardiac arrest so that if they know CPR they can get there before authorities do.

“They found that for every minute that CPR is withheld or delayed you lose about 10% of your chance of recovery, and within 10 minutes we typically have brain death starting to occur,” Wallin said.

Citizens feel this application will do great things for the community.

“I think it’s a good idea, I think that anytime you have that kind of help right there to save someone’s life it’s good,” off duty nurse Jennifer Kwasnkiewski said.

Read the full article by Jamie Elias at KVRR FOX.

Fargo, Moorhead unveil app to get quicker help for sudden cardiac arrest victims

Moorhead Fire Chief Richard DuysenA new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

A new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

The PulsePoint app is integrated with the Red River Regional Dispatch Center, which handles calls throughout the metro area. When a call comes in about a suspected cardiac arrest, the 911 communications center activates an alert to PulsePoint app users simultaneously with Fargo and Moorhead fire and police units and F-M Ambulance.

Using a smartphone’s geo-location services, the app alerts users trained in CPR who are within a quarter-mile of the victim, directing them via a live map to the person suffering cardiac arrest. It will also show the nearest automated external defibrillator, or AED.

Fire chiefs from both cities unveiled the app during a news conference at Fargo City Hall on Monday and said they expect the app to improve the communities’ survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest – a frequently fatal condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating.

“When someone experiences cardiac arrest, time is critical,” said Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen. “A victim may die within minutes unless they receive early CPR and have access to a defibrillator.”

Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin said the two cities are the first fire departments in North Dakota and Minnesota to implement PulsePoint.

“I would like to think we are at the front of a wave that is just sweeping across the country right now,” Wallin said.

Read the full article by Robin Huebner at INFORUM.

New medical app has potential to save lives

Fargo (ND) Press ConferenceFargo, ND (WDAY TV) – The difference between life and death could come down to a new Smartphone app.

Monday, Fargo and Moorhead fire departments announced the launch of Pulse Point.

It is an app that provides notifications for CPR and other emergencies in the immediate area of the person using the app.

F-M fire departments hope the app can save lives.

Jeff Wallin- Asst. Chief, Moorhead Fire Dept.: “It’s our hope that everybody in the community will download the application. Think about a friend, family worker, or coworker. If they suffer a problem right around the block; that instead of having somebody three to five minutes away, if you had somebody that was just one minute away around the corner… That could keep somebody alive until additional help can arrive can make a huge impact for everybody in the Fargo-Moorhead area.”

The app is up and running, so feel free to download it on your smart phone.

Watch the news clip from WDAY 6 (ABC) Fargo, ND.